Dragon Wings

Soaring Imagination

164 notes

Anonymous asked: Bucky tends to be cold constantly, and has trouble sleeping at night if he's at all cold because it brings back memories of the cryo tank, and his nightmares get worse as a result. Steve's fast metabolism means he tends to give off a lot of body heat--Bucky snuggles up against him at night because he actually feels warm for once in his life.

imaginebucky:

the first few nights after steve finds him he tries to tough it out alone, shivering fitfully no matter how many blankets he piles on top of himself. he knows steve went through so much to track him down, and he’s been endlessly patient and understanding when bucky struggles to speak or flinches back from even the gentlest of unexpected touches; he doesn’t want to make any more trouble. 

he’s trying so hard not to think about the hunk of icy metal that’s a part of him, sending not-entirely-temperature-related chills through his bones, that he doesn’t notice steve come in. it takes a cautious hand on his (warmer, flesh and bone) shoulder, a soft “bucky?”, before he starts and meets steve’s eyes. 

as always, they match the warmth seeping into bucky where steve’s hand still rests. the contrast is near-painful, and he can’t stop his shiver. 

"are you okay?" steve drops to one knee at the side of the bed, hand sliding to cradle the back of bucky’s neck. 

"cold," is all bucky can manage, closing his eyes and curling deeper into his pathetically inadequate nest of blankets. 

there’s a pause, only their breathing - bucky’s a fitful counterpart to steve’s deep, even breaths - breaking the silence. “would you -” steve finally says, and swallows. “i mean, would you be okay with me joining you?” 

bucky’s tired enough that the words take a long moment to sink in. the sense of relief once they do is profound. “please,” he says, fervent. 

it’s the work of a minute for bucky to move over, for steve to push a few of the extra blankets to the end of the bed. he slides into the bed behind bucky, a long, solid line of blessed warmth down his back, soft breaths on the back of his neck. steve’s arms curl around him, pulling him in tight, and bucky sighs out a long breath of relief. 

414 notes


I see things I forgot happened… Like a door unlocking in my mind… Torture… Slaughter… And training others in their use… So much horror… I wake up vomiting.

I see things I forgot happened… Like a door unlocking in my mind… Torture… Slaughter… And training others in their use… So much horror… I wake up vomiting.

(Source: memoryrecovery)

26,271 notes

sebastillestans:

i was watching the first avenger and wondering how Bucky knew Steve was getting his ass kicked in the back of some random alley behind a movie theatre

like does he just check alleyways whenever he’s walking down a street to see if Steve’s started another fight he can’t finish

the answer is probably yes

16,910 notes

whitegirlsaintshit:

america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 
The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.
An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.
For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.
It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.
That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.
This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…
(Read Full Text)



I said this when I was in fucking ninth grade and wrote a twelve paged paper on it and my teacher told me that I was a conspiracy theorist and that I needed a realistic topic. ok.

whitegirlsaintshit:

america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 

The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.

An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.

For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.

It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.

That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.

This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…

(Read Full Text)

I said this when I was in fucking ninth grade and wrote a twelve paged paper on it and my teacher told me that I was a conspiracy theorist and that I needed a realistic topic. ok.

(via brothers-on-a-motel-bed)